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This is a toolkit about burnout and vicarious trauma. It was created on June 6, 2020, with the intention of providing resources for self-care and healing amid the very necessary work of organizing specifically against anti-Black racism and police brutality, though these principles apply to any kind of movement work, and these movements are intersectional. This is a toolkit for organizers, students, parents, allies, and anyone for whom its message resonates.

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If you’re taking to the streets to demand justice for the victims of police brutality and homicide, you may want to leave your phone at home. At the same time, it’s a good idea to bring a phone to a protest so you can record what’s happening and get the message out on social media. To reconcile this tension — between wanting to protect your privacy and wanting to digitally document protests and police misdeeds — the safest option is to leave your primary phone, which contains a massive amount of private information about you, at home and instead bring a specially-prepared burner phone to protests. The Intercept’s Micah Lee discusses how to do this at length in this video.

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Removing symbols of the Confederacy from public spaces in your community can be daunting, but with proper planning, you can launch a successful campaign. This guide provides tools for building a campaign, including: Step-by-step instructions for organizing a campaign, Advice for countering objections to the removal of a symbol, Useful information about the Confederacy and its symbols, and Removing offensive Confederate symbols may be a long and difficult task.

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This toolkit was created to collate, condense and share the lessons Black Lives Matter activists have learned in ensuring that their direct actions are centered on healing justice. This toolkit is a beta version; it will develop in real time as they continue to uncover the implications for healing justice in their organizing.

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Systems mapping is an important element of any strategy for systemic change. Since systems are made up of a complex web of forces and relationships, and underpinned by mental models (values, beliefs and assumptions), then “mapping” these forces, relationships and mental models can be a key step towards developing an understanding of the system you want to change and developing effective strategies to shift it. This guide dives into three tools that can be used for this purpose as part of a campaign design process: system maps, network maps and narrative power analysis.

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“A security culture is a set of customs shared by a community whose members may be targeted by the government, designed to minimize risk.” This zine is an excellent introductory piece on security culture. It defines what a security culture is, gives practical examples of how it can be used and implemented, and addresses numerous other components of security culture.

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Advocacy  |   Initiative/campaign  |    

The Free to Shine campaign is an initiative of the African Union, the Organization of African First Ladies for Development (OAFLAD) and partners to address the growing complacency in the response to childhood HIV in Africa. The campaign aims to leverage the unique engagement and advocacy of first ladies in Africa, reinforcing the political commitment of African leadership, to end childhood HIV and keep mothers healthy.

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Most advocates working to end HIV criminalisation are not formally trained researchers. The thought of reading and using scientific studies may feel daunting. There is no “one best way” to use research for advocacy; no simple “paint-by-numbers” guide. But there are some basic principles and ideas about research and how to use it in advocacy that can be helpful. In this guide, we present those principles and ideas. Our goal is to demystify research about HIV criminalisation and suggest some of the ways it can be used by advocates.

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