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The Tracker monitors government responses to the pandemic that affect civic freedoms and human rights, focusing on emergency laws. The Tracker is a collaborative effort by the International Center for Not-for-Profit Law, European Center for Not-for-Profit Law, and our global network of partners, with generous research support from the UN Special Rapporteur on the promotion and protection of human rights and fundamental freedoms while countering terrorism.

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This handbook is meant for human rights defenders. It summarises the provisions of the EU and Norwegian Human Rights Defenders Guidelines. It also draws on the results of the EU’s own evaluation of the implementation of its Guidelines carried out in the first half of 2006, which stipulated many steps that should be taken to implement the Guidelines. The handbook details the ways in which the EU and Norway have committed themselves to supporting and protecting human rights defenders. It also makes suggestions to HRDs regarding how they might use these Guidelines as tools to improve their security.

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There’s a deluge of apps that detect your covid-19 exposure, often with little transparency. This Covid Tracing Tracker project will document them. When they began comparing apps around the world, they realized there was no central repository of information; just incomplete, constantly changing data spread across a wide range of sources. Nor was there a single, standard approach being taken by developers and policymakers: citizens of different countries were seeing radically different levels of surveillance and transparency. So to help monitor this fast-evolving situation, they are gathering the information into a single place for the first time with this Covid Tracing Tracker—a database to capture details of every significant automated contact tracing effort around the world.

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Systems mapping is an important element of any strategy for systemic change. Since systems are made up of a complex web of forces and relationships, and underpinned by mental models (values, beliefs and assumptions), then “mapping” these forces, relationships and mental models can be a key step towards developing an understanding of the system you want to change and developing effective strategies to shift it. This guide dives into three tools that can be used for this purpose as part of a campaign design process: system maps, network maps and narrative power analysis.

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Defending the jungles, mountains, forests and rivers of Latin America has never been this dangerous. Six of the ten most hostile countries for leaders and communities defending the environment and their ancestral lands are located in Latin America, according to UN Special Rapporteur Michel Forst’s 2016 report to United Nations. This is why 50 journalists, developers and photo/videographers from ten countries (Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Peru and Venezuela) teamed up to document to report on episodes of violence against environmental leaders and their communities. The result is this special investigative project with a database compiling 2,367 attacks spanning eleven years (2009-2019) and 29 in-depth stories on individual cases.

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Advocacy  |   Initiative/campaign  |    

The Free to Shine campaign is an initiative of the African Union, the Organization of African First Ladies for Development (OAFLAD) and partners to address the growing complacency in the response to childhood HIV in Africa. The campaign aims to leverage the unique engagement and advocacy of first ladies in Africa, reinforcing the political commitment of African leadership, to end childhood HIV and keep mothers healthy.

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This report focuses on the use of nonviolent collective action by civil society leaders, religious leaders, activists, and other South Sudanese to address the social, political, and economic grievances that have fueled the country.

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The Jordanian Civic Activist Toolkit II is designed to share with Jordan’s civic activists and organizations a rich selection of Jordanian advocacy campaigns from a wide range of civil society organizations initiatives that took place between 2014 and 2018 with support from the USAID Civic Initiatives Support program (CIS) (2013 – 2018). The toolkit includes a number of human rights-based advocacy case studies representing different themes addressing national and local issues.

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