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These pocket-sized know-your-rights (KYR) booklets are designed to be a practical resource for people dealing with law enforcement in the United States. The 16-page primer advises people of their rights when confronted by FBI agents or the Department of Homeland Security. It also includes information for noncitizens and minors.

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This publication details the procedures and the mechanisms needed in order to bring cases of alleged human rights violations to the attention of the United Nations. There are three such mechanisms:

  1. Individual complaints under the international human rights treaties (petitions)
  2. Individual communications under the special procedures of the Human Rights Council
  3. The complaint procedure of the Human Rights Council.
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The Legal Toolkit was created primarily as a go-to resource for lawyers representing people living with HIV who are facing criminal prosecution based on HIV status. However, other advocates are likely to find the Legal Toolkit useful. The Toolkit includes charts, articles, guidance, case law, legal analysis, scientific data and citations to empirical studies on the impact of HIV criminalization on individuals affected by HIV. The Toolkit pulls together into one place a wealth of information, both quick-reference resources (e.g. a Chart on the Relative Risk of HIV and other STIs) and links to longer reference materials (e.g. sample briefs) that are located, along with a summary of each document, in CHLP’s online HIV Policy Resource Bank.

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The purpose of this manual is to serve activists and students. This service is expected to unfold in three ways: (1) primarily as a manual for reporting to the Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights; (2) as a resource for students, particularly those in remote locations with less access to the Internet and large English language libraries; and (3) as an educational tool in training workshops, particularly for practical topics.

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Your State has committed to “ensure public access to information and protect fundamental freedoms”. This is what the Sustainable Development Goal 16.10 affirms. Is your government holding up to its commitment? You can help to monitor its progress – and contribute to it!

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The Safety of Journalists and the Danger of Impunity: Report by the UNESCO Director-General can be used to encourage governments to promote a safer environment for journalists and combat impunity for crimes against them – and hold them accountable if they don’t keep their promises. This is a 5-minute IFEX guide to the Director General’s report, and how you can use it to demand accountability for crimes against journalists.

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The UN Plan of Action on journalists’ safety provides an opportunity to join a multi-stakeholder effort to fight impunity for crimes against journalists. This 5-minute guide explains how to engage with the Plan for free expression advocacy.

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A 5-minute IFEX guide to how the UN checks whether or not governments are putting their international commitments on journalists’ safety and the problem of impunity into action – and how civil society can contribute.

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UNESCO’s Committee on Conventions and Recommendations (CR) offers a mechanism that any individual or group can use to try to get violations of rights, including the right to freedom of expression, addressed by States – but it’s relatively unknown. This 5-minute guide explains how the “Cre” can help individuals or groups to get countries to address human rights violations.

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