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The Legal Rights Center is a community-driven nonprofit law firm, specializing in adult criminal and juvenile delinquency defense, restorative justice practices and youth advocacy. The Legal Rights Center runs two programs: Community Defense Program and the Youth: Education, Advocacy & Restorative Services (Y:EARS) Program. While each program has distinct goals and methods, collectively they point to the overall vision of improving the experience of the justice system for communities of color, if not proactively by solving problems that prevent involvement in the justice system in the first place, then certainly after an individual has been swept up into the system.​

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The National Lawyers Guild is the nation’s oldest and largest progressive bar association and was the first one in the US to be racially integrated. Their mission is to use law for the people, uniting lawyers, law students, legal workers, and jailhouse lawyers to function as an effective force in the service of the people by valuing human rights and the rights of ecosystems over property interests.

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The Legal Toolkit was created primarily as a go-to resource for lawyers representing people living with HIV who are facing criminal prosecution based on HIV status. However, other advocates are likely to find the Legal Toolkit useful. The Toolkit includes charts, articles, guidance, case law, legal analysis, scientific data and citations to empirical studies on the impact of HIV criminalization on individuals affected by HIV. The Toolkit pulls together into one place a wealth of information, both quick-reference resources (e.g. a Chart on the Relative Risk of HIV and other STIs) and links to longer reference materials (e.g. sample briefs) that are located, along with a summary of each document, in CHLP’s online HIV Policy Resource Bank.

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The report “Rights in the Time of COVID-19 – Lessons from HIV for an Effective, Community-Led Response” from UNAIDS presents key lessons from the AIDS response that are crucial for an effective human rights-based approach to public health emergencies. They range from tackling stigma and discrimination faced by affected individuals and communities to prioritizing measures for reaching the most vulnerable, removing human rights barriers, establishing trust between communities and public health authorities and protecting critical frontline medical staff.

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The objective of this report is to contribute to a better understanding of State obligations aimed at guaranteeing, protecting, and facilitating public protests and demonstrations, as well as the standards that should frame the progressive use of force—and as a last resort—in protest contexts. The report stresses that demonstrators have the freedom to choose the mode, form, place, and message for peaceful protest, and States have the obligation to manage social conflict through dialogue.

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