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Child Rights International Network (CRIN)’s case studies illustrate how strategic litigation works in practice by asking the people involved about their experience. They aim to cover a wide range of violations and jurisdictions, and publicise little-known cases. By sharing these stories CRIN hopes to not only raise awareness of challenges to children’s rights violations around the world, but also give you the tools to challenge similar violations where you live.

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Children's rights  |   Guidelines  |    

The Abidjan Principles promises to be the new reference point for governments, educators and education providers when debating the respective roles and duties of states and private actors in education. They compile and unpack existing legal obligations that States have regarding the delivery of education, and in particular the role and limitations of private actors in the provision of education. They provide more details about what international human rights law means by drawing from other sources of law and existing authoritative interpretations.

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This factsheet brings resumed information on sex discrimination and sexual harassment in the workplace, and the law regarding the issue in British Columbia, Canada. Also, it provides information on how to make a Human Rights complaint on the matter.

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This factsheet provides information and examples of discrimination against Asian American, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander (AANHPI) and Muslim, Arab, Sikh and South Asian (MASSA) students, based on color, race and national origin.

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This paper brings information on the international, regional and Brazilian legal framework that covers the discrimination based on race in the workplace, as well as an approach on affirmative actions and Brazilian institutions.

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  (rating: 3 - 1 votes)
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