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The Legal Rights Center is a community-driven nonprofit law firm, specializing in adult criminal and juvenile delinquency defense, restorative justice practices and youth advocacy. The Legal Rights Center runs two programs: Community Defense Program and the Youth: Education, Advocacy & Restorative Services (Y:EARS) Program. While each program has distinct goals and methods, collectively they point to the overall vision of improving the experience of the justice system for communities of color, if not proactively by solving problems that prevent involvement in the justice system in the first place, then certainly after an individual has been swept up into the system.​

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The National Lawyers Guild is the nation’s oldest and largest progressive bar association and was the first one in the US to be racially integrated. Their mission is to use law for the people, uniting lawyers, law students, legal workers, and jailhouse lawyers to function as an effective force in the service of the people by valuing human rights and the rights of ecosystems over property interests.

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Digital activism  |   Action guide  |    

The Solidarity Action Network (SANE) brings together international civil society organisations (ICSOs) and their local partners to support each other when faced with undue threats to their operations. It enhances cooperative mechanisms for joint actions beyond public statements of solidarity to push back against clampdowns on civil society.

Solidarity Playbook – a Collection of Best Practices

We collect best practices and learnings on resilience and solidarity mechanisms developed by ICSOs and their CSO partners. We do this by capturing case studies and curating learnings and knowledge on organisational resilience mechanisms as well as coalition responses. We derive key findings and mechanisms out of this process. We take these steps to improve ICSOs’ and CSOs’ own preparedness to undue scrutiny and attacks.

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The Center provides legal assistance to indigenous peoples of the Americas to combat racism and oppression, to protect their lands and environment, to protect their cultures and ways of life, to achieve sustainable economic development and genuine self-government, and to realize their other human rights. The Indian Law Resource Center seeks to overcome the grave problems that threaten Native peoples by advancing the rule of law, by establishing national and international legal standards that preserve their human rights and dignity, and by challenging the governments of the world to accord justice and equality before the law to all indigenous peoples of the Americas.

The Indian Law Resource Center is a non-profit law and advocacy organization established and directed by American Indians. We provide legal assistance to Indian and Alaska Native nations who are working to protect their lands, resources, human rights, environment and cultural heritage. Our principal goal is the preservation and well-being of Indian and other Native nations and tribes. Founded in 1978, the Center provides assistance to Indian nations and indigenous peoples in the United States and throughout the Americas. The Center has an international Board of Directors, and is a Non-Governmental Organization in consultative status with the United Nations Economic and Social Council. The Indian Law Resource Center is a tax-exempt organization under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. We are funded by grants and contributions from individuals, foundations, and Indian nations. The Center accepts no government support.

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The Legal Toolkit was created primarily as a go-to resource for lawyers representing people living with HIV who are facing criminal prosecution based on HIV status. However, other advocates are likely to find the Legal Toolkit useful. The Toolkit includes charts, articles, guidance, case law, legal analysis, scientific data and citations to empirical studies on the impact of HIV criminalization on individuals affected by HIV. The Toolkit pulls together into one place a wealth of information, both quick-reference resources (e.g. a Chart on the Relative Risk of HIV and other STIs) and links to longer reference materials (e.g. sample briefs) that are located, along with a summary of each document, in CHLP’s online HIV Policy Resource Bank.

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This webpage explains what economic, social and cultural rights are, why they’re important and how they’re enforced. Economic, social, and cultural rights include the human right to work, the right to an adequate standard of living, including food, clothing, and housing, the right to physical and mental health, the right to social security, the right to a healthy environment, and the right to education.

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The report “Rights in the Time of COVID-19 – Lessons from HIV for an Effective, Community-Led Response” from UNAIDS presents key lessons from the AIDS response that are crucial for an effective human rights-based approach to public health emergencies. They range from tackling stigma and discrimination faced by affected individuals and communities to prioritizing measures for reaching the most vulnerable, removing human rights barriers, establishing trust between communities and public health authorities and protecting critical frontline medical staff.

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Child Rights International Network (CRIN)’s case studies illustrate how strategic litigation works in practice by asking the people involved about their experience. They aim to cover a wide range of violations and jurisdictions, and publicise little-known cases. By sharing these stories CRIN hopes to not only raise awareness of challenges to children’s rights violations around the world, but also give you the tools to challenge similar violations where you live.

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Children's rights  |   Guidelines  |    

The Abidjan Principles promises to be the new reference point for governments, educators and education providers when debating the respective roles and duties of states and private actors in education. They compile and unpack existing legal obligations that States have regarding the delivery of education, and in particular the role and limitations of private actors in the provision of education. They provide more details about what international human rights law means by drawing from other sources of law and existing authoritative interpretations.

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