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The Center provides legal assistance to indigenous peoples of the Americas to combat racism and oppression, to protect their lands and environment, to protect their cultures and ways of life, to achieve sustainable economic development and genuine self-government, and to realize their other human rights. The Indian Law Resource Center seeks to overcome the grave problems that threaten Native peoples by advancing the rule of law, by establishing national and international legal standards that preserve their human rights and dignity, and by challenging the governments of the world to accord justice and equality before the law to all indigenous peoples of the Americas.

The Indian Law Resource Center is a non-profit law and advocacy organization established and directed by American Indians. We provide legal assistance to Indian and Alaska Native nations who are working to protect their lands, resources, human rights, environment and cultural heritage. Our principal goal is the preservation and well-being of Indian and other Native nations and tribes. Founded in 1978, the Center provides assistance to Indian nations and indigenous peoples in the United States and throughout the Americas. The Center has an international Board of Directors, and is a Non-Governmental Organization in consultative status with the United Nations Economic and Social Council. The Indian Law Resource Center is a tax-exempt organization under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. We are funded by grants and contributions from individuals, foundations, and Indian nations. The Center accepts no government support.

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Child Rights International Network (CRIN)’s case studies illustrate how strategic litigation works in practice by asking the people involved about their experience. They aim to cover a wide range of violations and jurisdictions, and publicise little-known cases. By sharing these stories CRIN hopes to not only raise awareness of challenges to children’s rights violations around the world, but also give you the tools to challenge similar violations where you live.

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The aim of the Indigenous Fellowship Programme is to give indigenous persons the opportunity to gain knowledge on the UN system and mechanisms dealing with human rights issues in general and indigenous issues in particular. Trained participants are better equipped to assist their organisations and communities in protecting and promoting their rights. This training programme is available in 4 languages: English, Spanish, French and Russian.

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The ILO Convention has been one of the guiding documents in holding nations accountable to preserving indigenous people’s rights for almost a century. Through this convention, indigenous peopls have fought for economic and social rights and coordinated advocacy efforts on a global level.

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During the 22nd United Nations Working Group on Indigenous Populations, representatives of indigenous communities gathered in Geneva to discuss how best to address violence and conflict in order to preserve their survival.

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In this article, Professor Joshua Cooper outlines the process by which women might use the UN Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women to hold their governments accountable to preserving their rights.

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This video provides the full panel that occurred in April 2015 at Simon Fraser University in Canada. The different speakers talk on the accountability of Canadian companies abroad, the rights of indigenous groups in both a political and legal sense and the mindset of extractivism in Canada. There is a special focus on the different legal systems which arise in mining struggles – national, international and indigenous.

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This OXFAM document provides basic information about the right to Free, Prior, and Informed Consent (FPIC) according to Article 10 of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. This resource also outlines comprehensive steps on how to use FPIC to protect the rights of indigenous peoples against harmful development projects such as dams, mines, and logging.

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