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In this report, DefendDefenders examines the work of lawyers to identify their best practices, vulnerabilities, and needs in these rapidly changing environments. This report outlines several avenues governments, donors, and non-governmental organisations can take to help effectively promote the work of lawyers, such as capacity-building activities, and areas of immediate focus like psychosocial support.

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The National Lawyers Guild is the nation’s oldest and largest progressive bar association and was the first one in the US to be racially integrated. Their mission is to use law for the people, uniting lawyers, law students, legal workers, and jailhouse lawyers to function as an effective force in the service of the people by valuing human rights and the rights of ecosystems over property interests.

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This publication details the procedures and the mechanisms needed in order to bring cases of alleged human rights violations to the attention of the United Nations. There are three such mechanisms:

  1. Individual complaints under the international human rights treaties (petitions)
  2. Individual communications under the special procedures of the Human Rights Council
  3. The complaint procedure of the Human Rights Council.
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The Center provides legal assistance to indigenous peoples of the Americas to combat racism and oppression, to protect their lands and environment, to protect their cultures and ways of life, to achieve sustainable economic development and genuine self-government, and to realize their other human rights. The Indian Law Resource Center seeks to overcome the grave problems that threaten Native peoples by advancing the rule of law, by establishing national and international legal standards that preserve their human rights and dignity, and by challenging the governments of the world to accord justice and equality before the law to all indigenous peoples of the Americas.

The Indian Law Resource Center is a non-profit law and advocacy organization established and directed by American Indians. We provide legal assistance to Indian and Alaska Native nations who are working to protect their lands, resources, human rights, environment and cultural heritage. Our principal goal is the preservation and well-being of Indian and other Native nations and tribes. Founded in 1978, the Center provides assistance to Indian nations and indigenous peoples in the United States and throughout the Americas. The Center has an international Board of Directors, and is a Non-Governmental Organization in consultative status with the United Nations Economic and Social Council. The Indian Law Resource Center is a tax-exempt organization under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. We are funded by grants and contributions from individuals, foundations, and Indian nations. The Center accepts no government support.

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The Legal Toolkit was created primarily as a go-to resource for lawyers representing people living with HIV who are facing criminal prosecution based on HIV status. However, other advocates are likely to find the Legal Toolkit useful. The Toolkit includes charts, articles, guidance, case law, legal analysis, scientific data and citations to empirical studies on the impact of HIV criminalization on individuals affected by HIV. The Toolkit pulls together into one place a wealth of information, both quick-reference resources (e.g. a Chart on the Relative Risk of HIV and other STIs) and links to longer reference materials (e.g. sample briefs) that are located, along with a summary of each document, in CHLP’s online HIV Policy Resource Bank.

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The purpose of this manual is to serve activists and students. This service is expected to unfold in three ways: (1) primarily as a manual for reporting to the Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights; (2) as a resource for students, particularly those in remote locations with less access to the Internet and large English language libraries; and (3) as an educational tool in training workshops, particularly for practical topics.

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The report “Rights in the Time of COVID-19 – Lessons from HIV for an Effective, Community-Led Response” from UNAIDS presents key lessons from the AIDS response that are crucial for an effective human rights-based approach to public health emergencies. They range from tackling stigma and discrimination faced by affected individuals and communities to prioritizing measures for reaching the most vulnerable, removing human rights barriers, establishing trust between communities and public health authorities and protecting critical frontline medical staff.

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Your State has committed to “ensure public access to information and protect fundamental freedoms”. This is what the Sustainable Development Goal 16.10 affirms. Is your government holding up to its commitment? You can help to monitor its progress – and contribute to it!

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The Safety of Journalists and the Danger of Impunity: Report by the UNESCO Director-General can be used to encourage governments to promote a safer environment for journalists and combat impunity for crimes against them – and hold them accountable if they don’t keep their promises. This is a 5-minute IFEX guide to the Director General’s report, and how you can use it to demand accountability for crimes against journalists.

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