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This webpage explains what economic, social and cultural rights are, why they’re important and how they’re enforced. Economic, social, and cultural rights include the human right to work, the right to an adequate standard of living, including food, clothing, and housing, the right to physical and mental health, the right to social security, the right to a healthy environment, and the right to education.

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The purpose of this manual is to serve activists and students. This service is expected to unfold in three ways: (1) primarily as a manual for reporting to the Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights; (2) as a resource for students, particularly those in remote locations with less access to the Internet and large English language libraries; and (3) as an educational tool in training workshops, particularly for practical topics.

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The report “Rights in the Time of COVID-19 – Lessons from HIV for an Effective, Community-Led Response” from UNAIDS presents key lessons from the AIDS response that are crucial for an effective human rights-based approach to public health emergencies. They range from tackling stigma and discrimination faced by affected individuals and communities to prioritizing measures for reaching the most vulnerable, removing human rights barriers, establishing trust between communities and public health authorities and protecting critical frontline medical staff.

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Child Rights International Network (CRIN)’s case studies illustrate how strategic litigation works in practice by asking the people involved about their experience. They aim to cover a wide range of violations and jurisdictions, and publicise little-known cases. By sharing these stories CRIN hopes to not only raise awareness of challenges to children’s rights violations around the world, but also give you the tools to challenge similar violations where you live.

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Children's rights  |   Guidelines  |    

The Abidjan Principles promises to be the new reference point for governments, educators and education providers when debating the respective roles and duties of states and private actors in education. They compile and unpack existing legal obligations that States have regarding the delivery of education, and in particular the role and limitations of private actors in the provision of education. They provide more details about what international human rights law means by drawing from other sources of law and existing authoritative interpretations.

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