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This publication details the procedures and the mechanisms needed in order to bring cases of alleged human rights violations to the attention of the United Nations. There are three such mechanisms:

  1. Individual complaints under the international human rights treaties (petitions)
  2. Individual communications under the special procedures of the Human Rights Council
  3. The complaint procedure of the Human Rights Council.
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The Center provides legal assistance to indigenous peoples of the Americas to combat racism and oppression, to protect their lands and environment, to protect their cultures and ways of life, to achieve sustainable economic development and genuine self-government, and to realize their other human rights. The Indian Law Resource Center seeks to overcome the grave problems that threaten Native peoples by advancing the rule of law, by establishing national and international legal standards that preserve their human rights and dignity, and by challenging the governments of the world to accord justice and equality before the law to all indigenous peoples of the Americas.

The Indian Law Resource Center is a non-profit law and advocacy organization established and directed by American Indians. We provide legal assistance to Indian and Alaska Native nations who are working to protect their lands, resources, human rights, environment and cultural heritage. Our principal goal is the preservation and well-being of Indian and other Native nations and tribes. Founded in 1978, the Center provides assistance to Indian nations and indigenous peoples in the United States and throughout the Americas. The Center has an international Board of Directors, and is a Non-Governmental Organization in consultative status with the United Nations Economic and Social Council. The Indian Law Resource Center is a tax-exempt organization under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. We are funded by grants and contributions from individuals, foundations, and Indian nations. The Center accepts no government support.

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This webpage explains what economic, social and cultural rights are, why they’re important and how they’re enforced. Economic, social, and cultural rights include the human right to work, the right to an adequate standard of living, including food, clothing, and housing, the right to physical and mental health, the right to social security, the right to a healthy environment, and the right to education.

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The purpose of this manual is to serve activists and students. This service is expected to unfold in three ways: (1) primarily as a manual for reporting to the Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights; (2) as a resource for students, particularly those in remote locations with less access to the Internet and large English language libraries; and (3) as an educational tool in training workshops, particularly for practical topics.

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Your State has committed to “ensure public access to information and protect fundamental freedoms”. This is what the Sustainable Development Goal 16.10 affirms. Is your government holding up to its commitment? You can help to monitor its progress – and contribute to it!

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The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR) is a crucial player in efforts to promote and protect human rights in the Americas region. Find out how you can use it to bolster your free expression advocacy.

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The Case Law Database (“CLD”) is a gateway to the jurisprudence of the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (“ICTR”), the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (“ICTY”) and International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals (“IRMCT”) Appeals Chambers.

It provides direct access to extracts of key judgements and decisions rendered by the ICTR, ICTY, and IRMCT Appeals Chambers since their inception, as well as to full-text versions of the corresponding appeal judgements and decisions.

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The Access to Justice (A2J) Lab creates knowledge, constructs best practices, and trains current and future scholars and practitioners to transform the U.S. justice system. The A2J Lab aims to provide decision makers in law with credible evidence about what works, and allow them to implement solution that provide better access to justice for individuals and families.

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