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This webpage explains what economic, social and cultural rights are, why they’re important and how they’re enforced. Economic, social, and cultural rights include the human right to work, the right to an adequate standard of living, including food, clothing, and housing, the right to physical and mental health, the right to social security, the right to a healthy environment, and the right to education.

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The purpose of this manual is to serve activists and students. This service is expected to unfold in three ways: (1) primarily as a manual for reporting to the Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights; (2) as a resource for students, particularly those in remote locations with less access to the Internet and large English language libraries; and (3) as an educational tool in training workshops, particularly for practical topics.

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The report “Rights in the Time of COVID-19 – Lessons from HIV for an Effective, Community-Led Response” from UNAIDS presents key lessons from the AIDS response that are crucial for an effective human rights-based approach to public health emergencies. They range from tackling stigma and discrimination faced by affected individuals and communities to prioritizing measures for reaching the most vulnerable, removing human rights barriers, establishing trust between communities and public health authorities and protecting critical frontline medical staff.

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Your State has committed to “ensure public access to information and protect fundamental freedoms”. This is what the Sustainable Development Goal 16.10 affirms. Is your government holding up to its commitment? You can help to monitor its progress – and contribute to it!

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The Safety of Journalists and the Danger of Impunity: Report by the UNESCO Director-General can be used to encourage governments to promote a safer environment for journalists and combat impunity for crimes against them – and hold them accountable if they don’t keep their promises. This is a 5-minute IFEX guide to the Director General’s report, and how you can use it to demand accountability for crimes against journalists.

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The UN Plan of Action on journalists’ safety provides an opportunity to join a multi-stakeholder effort to fight impunity for crimes against journalists. This 5-minute guide explains how to engage with the Plan for free expression advocacy.

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A 5-minute IFEX guide to how the UN checks whether or not governments are putting their international commitments on journalists’ safety and the problem of impunity into action – and how civil society can contribute.

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UNESCO’s Committee on Conventions and Recommendations (CR) offers a mechanism that any individual or group can use to try to get violations of rights, including the right to freedom of expression, addressed by States – but it’s relatively unknown. This 5-minute guide explains how the “Cre” can help individuals or groups to get countries to address human rights violations.

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