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International criminal law, though not quite as comprehensively codified or as widely ratified by States as international human rights obligations, is relevant to the study and protection of international human rights because it, generally, is aimed at punishing acts which affect fundamental human rights, namely: life, liberty, and security. This factsheet provides definitions and resources for further research.

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On March 17, 2003, the United Nations reached a draft agreement with the Cambodian government for an international criminal tribunal, the so called Extraordinary Cambers in the Courts of Cambodia (ECCC), to try former Khmer Rouge leaders.This page follows the investigations, indictments and proceedings of the Tribunal.

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In 2006 the Security Council created the Serious Crimes Investigation Team (SCIT) to resume the investigative functions of the former Serious Crimes Investigation Unit. This page follows the work of the SCIT, and provides analysis on the issue of justice vs. reconciliation in East Timor.

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In 1995 a handful of NGOs formed the NGO Coalition for an International Criminal Court (CICC). The coalition now includes over 2,500 NGOs worldwide united in their support for a fair and effective International Criminal Court (ICC). The CICC played a uniquely influential role in the establishment of this international institution. It significantly contributed to the process from the early discussions at the UN, through the Rome Statue, the ratification campaign and beyond.

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This Human Rights Watch guide explains the structure of the International Criminal Court (ICC) and asserts that NGOs can continue to show support for the ICC by sharing information with the public and the Court, and aiding victims and witnesses.

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On 16 January 2013, the Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court (ICC) formally opened an investigation into alleged crimes committed on the territory of Mali since January 2012. In this video, Fadi El Abdallah, ICC Spokesperson and Head of Public Affairs Unit, and Amady Ba, Head of International Cooperation at the Office of the Prosecutor of the Court, answer questions concerning this investigation.

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The UN Security Council established the International Criminal Tribunal of Rwanda (ICTR) to prosecute those most responsible for the 1994 genocide during which hundreds of thousands of Tutsis and moderate Hutus were murdered. This page follows the development of important cases at the ICTR and provides analysis of the tribunals’ effectiveness.

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After the Rwandan genocide, the country struggled to implement justice and provide the closure needed to rebuild the social structure of the country. In 2002, the government decided to use community based Gacaca courts to try the majority of cases in order to expedite the justice process. This Human Rights Watch report analyzes the use of community-based courts for handling post-conflict justice.

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During the Bosnian war in the early 1990s ethnic cleansing, genocide and other serious crimes were committed on all sides. In May, 1993, the UN Security Council established the International Criminal Tribunal for Yugoslavia (ICTY) to try those responsible for violations of international humanitarian law in the territory of the former Yugoslavia since 1991. This page follows the development of important cases in The Hague with special attention to the trial of Radovan Karad

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