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International criminal law, though not quite as comprehensively codified or as widely ratified by States as international human rights obligations, is relevant to the study and protection of international human rights because it, generally, is aimed at punishing acts which affect fundamental human rights, namely: life, liberty, and security. This factsheet provides definitions and resources for further research.

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International humanitarian law (IHL), also known as the laws of war and the law of armed conflict, is the legal framework applicable to situations of armed conflict and occupation. This factsheet provides definition and resources for further reading on IHL.

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The conditions prevailing today in Pakistan affect every individual life. If we are to improve conditions then the law must be upheld to bring peace and security to the land and to build lives of dignity and respect. If we are to build a better nation then familiarity with the law is also to some degree necessary.Listed here are the points that are covered by the constitution of Pakistan. Links are provided to get the full detail.

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During the Bosnian war in the early 1990s ethnic cleansing, genocide and other serious crimes were committed on all sides. In May, 1993, the UN Security Council established the International Criminal Tribunal for Yugoslavia (ICTY) to try those responsible for violations of international humanitarian law in the territory of the former Yugoslavia since 1991. This page follows the development of important cases in The Hague with special attention to the trial of Radovan Karad

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This Institute for War and Peace Reporting document is a straightforward, yet comprehensive “beginner’s guide” to the International Criminal Tribunal for Yugoslavia. It covers the tribunal’s establishment, mission and jurisdiction, as well as its relationship with national courts. The guide also provides basic information on how a case is conducted; from indictments and arrests, through to sentencing and appeals.

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In January 2002 the UN approved the Special Court for Sierra Leone (SCSL) to try those responsible for the crimes committed during the civil war. Based in the country where the atrocities were committed and combining international and domestic law, the SCSL ushers in a new generation of international tribunals.On June 4 2007, the Court started the trial against Charles Taylor who has been indicted for war crimes. This page follows this case and other important cases being heard by the Special Court for Sierra Leone and provides analysis of the court’s effectiveness.

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On June 10 2007, the Special Tribunal for Lebanon came into force after a negotiated agreement between the Lebanese government and the United Nations. The Tribunal has a mixed composition of Lebanese and international judges and has its seat near The Hague in the Netherlands. It differs, however, from other hybrid model tribunals as it was set up to try a domestic criminal case and would probably not have came into being had it not been for regional politics. This page follows the investigations, indictments and proceedings of the Tribunal.

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On March 17, 2003, the United Nations reached a draft agreement with the Cambodian government for an international criminal tribunal, the so called Extraordinary Cambers in the Courts of Cambodia (ECCC), to try former Khmer Rouge leaders.This page follows the investigations, indictments and proceedings of the Tribunal.

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