164 results found

This publication details the procedures and the mechanisms needed in order to bring cases of alleged human rights violations to the attention of the United Nations. There are three such mechanisms:

  1. Individual complaints under the international human rights treaties (petitions)
  2. Individual communications under the special procedures of the Human Rights Council
  3. The complaint procedure of the Human Rights Council.
Feedback helps us improve:
  (rating: 0 - 0 votes)
Digital activism  |   Action guide  |    

The Solidarity Action Network (SANE) brings together international civil society organisations (ICSOs) and their local partners to support each other when faced with undue threats to their operations. It enhances cooperative mechanisms for joint actions beyond public statements of solidarity to push back against clampdowns on civil society.

Solidarity Playbook – a Collection of Best Practices

We collect best practices and learnings on resilience and solidarity mechanisms developed by ICSOs and their CSO partners. We do this by capturing case studies and curating learnings and knowledge on organisational resilience mechanisms as well as coalition responses. We derive key findings and mechanisms out of this process. We take these steps to improve ICSOs’ and CSOs’ own preparedness to undue scrutiny and attacks.

Feedback helps us improve:
  (rating: 0 - 0 votes)

The Center provides legal assistance to indigenous peoples of the Americas to combat racism and oppression, to protect their lands and environment, to protect their cultures and ways of life, to achieve sustainable economic development and genuine self-government, and to realize their other human rights. The Indian Law Resource Center seeks to overcome the grave problems that threaten Native peoples by advancing the rule of law, by establishing national and international legal standards that preserve their human rights and dignity, and by challenging the governments of the world to accord justice and equality before the law to all indigenous peoples of the Americas.

The Indian Law Resource Center is a non-profit law and advocacy organization established and directed by American Indians. We provide legal assistance to Indian and Alaska Native nations who are working to protect their lands, resources, human rights, environment and cultural heritage. Our principal goal is the preservation and well-being of Indian and other Native nations and tribes. Founded in 1978, the Center provides assistance to Indian nations and indigenous peoples in the United States and throughout the Americas. The Center has an international Board of Directors, and is a Non-Governmental Organization in consultative status with the United Nations Economic and Social Council. The Indian Law Resource Center is a tax-exempt organization under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. We are funded by grants and contributions from individuals, foundations, and Indian nations. The Center accepts no government support.

Feedback helps us improve:
  (rating: 0 - 0 votes)

Defending the jungles, mountains, forests and rivers of Latin America has never been this dangerous. Six of the ten most hostile countries for leaders and communities defending the environment and their ancestral lands are located in Latin America, according to UN Special Rapporteur Michel Forst’s 2016 report to United Nations. This is why 50 journalists, developers and photo/videographers from ten countries (Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Peru and Venezuela) teamed up to document to report on episodes of violence against environmental leaders and their communities. The result is this special investigative project with a database compiling 2,367 attacks spanning eleven years (2009-2019) and 29 in-depth stories on individual cases.

Feedback helps us improve:
  (rating: 0 - 0 votes)

This webpage explains what economic, social and cultural rights are, why they’re important and how they’re enforced. Economic, social, and cultural rights include the human right to work, the right to an adequate standard of living, including food, clothing, and housing, the right to physical and mental health, the right to social security, the right to a healthy environment, and the right to education.

Feedback helps us improve:
  (rating: 0 - 0 votes)

The Blueprints for Change Progressive Organizing and Campaigning Manual is a compilation of all guides produced through Blueprints for Change up till November 2019 in its current edition. This includes 14 detailed how-to guides on cutting-edge approaches to progressive organizing and mobilizing.

Feedback helps us improve:
  (rating: 0 - 0 votes)

Care2 

 Activist Toolkit

Care2 is a network of millions of people around the globe, dedicated to building a better world. They use their cutting-edge technology and team of experienced campaigners to fuel the progressive movement by uniting their members with nonprofits and mission-based brands working on the causes they care about.

Feedback helps us improve:
  (rating: 0 - 0 votes)

Cyberwomen is a digital security curriculum with a holistic and gender perspective, aimed at offering trainers with tools to provide in-person learning experiences to human rights defenders and journalists working in high-risk environments. The guide is geared towards both professional trainers and those who want to learn how to train others on their digital protection, and include gender considerations as they do so.

Feedback helps us improve:
  (rating: 0 - 0 votes)

Your State has committed to “ensure public access to information and protect fundamental freedoms”. This is what the Sustainable Development Goal 16.10 affirms. Is your government holding up to its commitment? You can help to monitor its progress – and contribute to it!

Feedback helps us improve:
  (rating: 0 - 0 votes)
Translate »