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If you’re taking to the streets to demand justice for the victims of police brutality and homicide, you may want to leave your phone at home. At the same time, it’s a good idea to bring a phone to a protest so you can record what’s happening and get the message out on social media. To reconcile this tension — between wanting to protect your privacy and wanting to digitally document protests and police misdeeds — the safest option is to leave your primary phone, which contains a massive amount of private information about you, at home and instead bring a specially-prepared burner phone to protests. The Intercept’s Micah Lee discusses how to do this at length in this video.

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Journalist and broadcaster Susan Bookbinder talks with four women about how they would like to see professionals hold sensitive conversations about female genital mutilation (FGM), including what actions to take to safeguard vulnerable girls.

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This video provides the full panel that occurred in April 2015 at Simon Fraser University in Canada. The different speakers talk on the accountability of Canadian companies abroad, the rights of indigenous groups in both a political and legal sense and the mindset of extractivism in Canada. There is a special focus on the different legal systems which arise in mining struggles – national, international and indigenous.

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MOOC CHILE’s Introduction to Human Rights and Environment covers six points. 1. the concept of the environment. 2. the basis for the protection of the environment. 3. the protection of the environment as a human rights issue. 4. main international documents and treaties. 5. key environmental principles. 6. NGO’s

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A conversation with Salvadoran human rights defenders Mirla Carbajal, lawyer with the Human Rights Institute of the Universidad Centroamericana, and Dina Cabrera, community activist and survivor of the Santa Cruz massacre; and Philippe Bourgois, Professor of Psychiatry and Anthropology at UCLA and survivor of the Santa Cruz massacre.

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